SIGCSE 2014 papers

Posted on October 18, 2013

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The CSER group has had several papers accepted for publication at next year’s SIGCSE conference, which will be held in Atlanta. It will be a fantastic opportunity to present some updates on previous work, as well as introducing some new areas of research that we have been exploring.

The first paper follows up our previous work (presented at the ICER conference) examining student submission data and behaviours in a large student submission dataset. In this paper, we look at automated assessment mechanisms, and the impact of feedback and mark granularity on student behaviour, identifying that students behave differently depending on the granularity used (or perceived) by the student.

N. Falkner, R. Vivian, D. Piper and K. Falkner, Increasing the Effectiveness of Automated Assessment By Increasing Marking Granularity and Feedback Units. Accepted for the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2013), March, 2014.

The second paper introduces a new curriculum analysis framework based on Neo-Piagetian theory, that assists in tracing concept development and assessment across a curriculum. We use Neo-Piagetian theory to assess learning and assessment opportunities according to the stage of development assumed, for example, teaching a new concept within a familiar context, or assessing a concept within a new context, and with unfamiliar processes or patterns.  This enables us to observe gaps where we have taught a concept at one level but assessed it subsequently at a much higher level.  We have used this framework to map the development of concepts across our first year curriculum, identifying both prerequisite gaps (assessed but not taught) and assessment leaps (a significant difference between level of teaching demonstration and assessment).  Of course, this does not necessarily imply an issue, but does indicate the need for awareness of such a gap!

C. Szabo and K. Falkner, Neo-Piagetian Theory as a Guide to Curriculum Analysis. Accepted for the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2013), March, 2014.

We also have some new work within the area of Software Engineering development. Claudia Szabo will be presenting two papers exploring new activities in our Software Engineering courses: one on the use of GameDevTycoon for teaching Software Engineering, including a comparison with other games designed to help teach Software Engineering skills, and the second exploring the use of past student projects as a source for a substantive codebase for software maintenance, a topic that is often taught with small-scale examples.

C. Szabo, Evaluating GameDevTycoon for Teaching Software Engineering.  Accepted for the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2013), March, 2014.

C. Szabo, Student Projects Are Not Throwaways: Teaching Practical Software Maintenance in a Software Engineering Course. Accepted for the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2013), March, 2014.

And lastly, Nick Falkner will presenting a Workshop on Puzzle-Based Learning. Nick has been working for several years on the development of this approach to creative and critical thinking, and will be presenting this workshop along with colleagues from Adelaide, CMU and Baldwin Wallace University.

R. Sooriamurthi, N. Falkner, E. Meyer and Z. Michalewicz, Puzzle-Based Learning: Introducing Creative Thinking and Problem Solving for Computer Science and Engineering. Accepted for the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2013), March, 2014.

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Posted in: Publications, SIGCSE